WinDeclare300x198Xojo Windows Declare Version 2.6 has just been finished with more examples, more constants, more data, more explanations, updates from ANSI to Unicode, all Windows 10 compatible, both 32-bit and 64-bit compatible, and updated to Xojo 2018 r2. Version 1.x of the Declares book has been impressive and has had many updates for programmers. With the release of Xojo 64-bit debugger coming soon, the declares also needed updating. 

Xojo provides a RAD (Rapid Application Development) environment because it protects the user from the Operating System. Xojo has many helpful functions, and declares add to this existing toolbox.

Tapping into the Operating System directly with Declares opens up almost all of the options available for a program - but you are also out of the protection of the safe IDE (Integrated Development Environment) of Xojo. With the ability to change anything with the program or operating system, improper code also provides the ability of a crash. This is written for intermediate and advanced programmers of Xojo.

Thanks to Julian Samphire for work on the 64-bit version of the ChooseColor example and for his comprehensive list of Xojo Data Type Conversions

All examples have been converted to both 32-bit and 64-bit versions.This book is Version 2.6 (September 2018).

WMICHas someone ever asked you the question "Is my computer 32-bit or 64-bit"? WMIC is the command that can retrieve this information about a Windows Operating System and almost all of the components installed on the computer. WMIC is the abbreviation for Windows Management Instrumentation Command-Line that has been used for over a decade in the Windows OS.

The book "I Wish I Knew How To...Program Windows WMIC With Xojo" is able to query hundreds of parameters on the computer and this code can be implemented into your program. This is a reference book that shows the many possible options of WMIC and retrieves data seamlessly to your program. 

The most difficult part of working with WMIC is to provide the correct search parameters, which this book covers in all of these chapters.

stepYou can do many things with the Raspberry Pi, and some have built a Star Trek interface, while others have built robots. This book provides the building block to work with Xojo to react with the real world through its motherboard to allow you to make your own interesting device. This inexpensive computer can be programed by the widely recognized Xojo programming language. 

This book “I Wish I Knew How to … Program Raspberry Pi 3B+ Electronics with Xojo” goes into the numerous programs that can be built to interact with many types of electronic gadgets.This book uses the latest Raspberry Pi 3B+ hardware with the newest version of the Stretch Operating System. 

Note: There is a different book for the older version for pre Xojo 2017 r3, Jessie OS, and pre-Pi 3 B hardware. This book is for programing with the latest Raspberry Pi 3 B+ hardware, with the Stretch OS, and post 2018 r1 Xojo IDE!

The ‘I Wish I Knew’ series contains technical data and advice that makes sense and contains practical and numerous examples with explanations to allow you to ease into the steep programming curve. There are many electronic examples and the book also has many references to the Stretch Linux Operating System that is used with the Raspberry Pi. 

You can start building your own electronic projects with Raspberry Pi today!

Excel is well-known in the business world for spreadsheets and math, and did you know that Excel can even create a 3D Animated Coaster!Excel2016Graphic

This book “I Wish I Knew How to … Program Excel 2016 with Xojo in Windows” goes into the numerous options of programming Excel.

With the many great improvements and updates to both Xojo and Microsoft Excel, the 2016 version contains many code updates.

The ‘I Wish I Knew’ series contains technical data and advice that makes sense and contains practical and numerous examples with explanations to allow you to ease into the steep programming curve. You can create Microsoft Excel applications today!